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The Turkish language belongs to the family of Urabolatian languages ​​along with Hungarian and Finnish. The Ottomans used the Arabic alphabet, throughout their empire (13th-20th centuries). But after Democracy was established (1928), Kemal Ataturk, wanting to bring language closer to the western world, intervened on the alphabet as well as on the vocabulary and syntax. Thus, he imposed the Latin alphabet, simplified his editorial structure and rewrote words of the old Turkish (pre-Ottoman) language, aimed at strengthening the ethnic consciousness of the Turkish people.

Turkish language is based on rather inviolable rules, but when its structure is understood then its learning becomes simple. This is also why the large weight in the language learning process falls on the first year of the course, when the structure is taught and the special features are identified. Today, the Turkish language is spoken approximately by 80,000,000 people, besides the Turks that live in Turkey.

Turkey is characterized by a diverse culture, a result of the Turks’ influence from the pre-existing peoples migrating from Asia to the West. The Ottoman civilization over the centuries, taking insights from the ancient Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic influences, gave us the “mosaic” of today’s Turkish culture.

Istanbul or Constantinople is the largest city in Turkey, and at the same time it is a great economic, cultural and industrial center. The well-known marketplaces or the grand bazaars of Turkey, with the strong aroma of spices, are places where the various elements of cultures meet, but they also bear witness to the nomadic life of the Turkish tribes before they formed today’s single culture. The famous Turkish Baths or Hammam are meeting places but also an architectural beauty. Turkish coffee and the way it is served, although originating from East Africa, has been established in Turkey and is an important part of the everyday life and culture of the Turks.